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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions











For any other technical issues, please contact our Technical Support.


38999 series I, II, III Answers

Q1- What are the main differences between MIL-DTL-38999 series I, II and III connectors?

MIL-DTL-38999 series I connectors (Amphenol LJT series) are bayonet coupling connectors, with 100% scoop proof design, available for connector size 9 to 25. Only metal shell versions are available. (see LJT-HE308 catalog)

MIL-DTL-38999 series II connectors (Amphenol JT series) are bayonet coupling low profile connectors, with non scoop proof design, available for connector size 8 to 24. EMI grounding fingers are optional in JT plugs. Only metal shell versions are available. (see JT catalog )

MIL-DTL-38999 series III connectors (Amphenol TV / CTV series) are thread coupling connectors, with 100% scoop proof design, available for connector size 9 to 25. Metal and composite shell versions are available. EN3645 is the corresponding European standard for this series. (see Catalog Amphenol TV-CTV).

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Q2 - Why Amphenol is putting a « J » at the beginning of military 38999 connector part numbers like “JD38999/24WB35PN” or “JMS27468T11B35P” ?
The J is called “JAN brand” in the MIL-DTL-38999 standard.

This is a proof that our connectors are QPL approved by American authorities.

Corresponding MIL-DTL-38999 rev L standard paragraph:

3.52.2 JAN and J marking. The United States Government has adopted and is exercising legitimate control over the certification marks "JAN" and "J", respectively, to indicate that items so marked or identified are manufactured to, and meet all the requirements of specifications. Accordingly, items acquired to, and meeting all of the criteria specified herein and in applicable specifications, shall bear the certification mark "JAN" except that items too small to bear the certification mark "JAN" shall bear the letter "J". The "JAN" or "J" shall be placed immediately before the part number except that if such location would place a hardship on the manufacturer in connection with such marking, the "JAN" or "J" may be located on the first line above or below the part number. Items furnished under contracts or orders which either permit or require deviation from the conditions or requirements specified herein or in applicable specifications shall not bear "JAN" or "J". In the event an item fails to meet the requirements of this specification and the applicable specification sheets or associated detail specifications, the manufacturer shall remove completely the military part number and the "JAN" or the "J" from the sample tested and also from all items represented by the sample. The "JAN" or "J" certification mark shall not be used on products acquired to contractor drawings or specification. The United States Government has obtained Certificate of Registration Number 504,860 for the certification mark "JAN" and Registration Number 1,586,261 for the certification mark “J”.

Note: The “JAN” or “J” is not part of the PIN but indicates a certification.

 

- How to order MIL-DTL-38999 series I connectors in military designation: see page 32 of LJT/HE308 catalogue LJT-HE308 catalogue

- How to order MIL-DTL-38999 series II connectors in military designation: see page 24 of JT catalogue   JT catalogue

- How to order MIL-DTL-38999 series III connectors in military designation: see page 37 of TV-CTV catalogue Catalogue Amphenol TV-CTV  

Q3 - Are 38999 square flange receptacles delivered with sealing gaskets?

In MIL-DTL-38999 series II connectors (Amphenol JT connectors) and MIL-DTL-38999 series III connectors (Amphenol TV-CTV connectors), square flange receptacle are never delivered with sealing gasket.

In MIL-DTL-38999 series I connectors (Amphenol LJT series), only LJT00 wall mounting receptacles (also marked in HE308 00, or JMS27466 designations) are delivered with non conductive sealing gasket.   

Non conductive gaskets can be purchased separately, please consult us.

Q4 - Are 38999 jam nut receptacles delivered with sealing gaskets ?

Yes, they are always delivered with non conductive sealing gaskets.

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Q5 - Are 38999 square flange receptacles delivered with screws? 

Screw are never delivered with any type of MIL-DTL-38999 square flange receptacles. Thread types are given in product catalogues, and customer choose by themselves appropriate screw they would like to use.

Q6 - Can all MIL-DTL-38999 connectors accept backshells?

All types of plugs and receptacles can accept backshells, except box mounting receptacles (LJT02, LJTP02, JT02, JTP02, TVP02, CTVP02), which do not have any thread at the rear of connector. 

Each backshell can be used on both plug and receptacle of the same connector range and size (ex: TV NSA 15 014 can be put at the rear of both TV06RW1535P and TVP00RW1535S or TV07RW1519P)

Q7 - Are backshells delivered with MIL-DTL-38999 connectors?

·         MIL-DTL-38999 series I connectors are generally not delivered with backshell, except for:

o    LJT xx RE versions (= JMS27xxx E), which are delivered with grommet nut

o    LJT xx RE xxx SR versions, which are delivered with strain relief

·         MIL-DTL-38999 series II connectors are generally not delivered with backshell, except for:

o    JT xx RE versions (= JMS27xxx E), which are delivered with grommet nut

o    JT xx RE xxx SR versions, which are delivered with strain relief 

·         MIL-DTL-38999 series III connectors are not delivered with any type of backshell.

To get further information on our backshell offer, please consult our backshell catalog.

Q8- What are the coupling torque values to use for threading of hexagonal nuts on jam nut receptacles?

Coupling torque values are given:

-                     -      at page 15 of TV-CTV catalog for CTV07 connectors (see Catalog Amphenol TV-CTV )

-       at page 17 of TV-CTV catalog for TV07 connectors (see Catalog Amphenol TV-CTV )

-       at page 13 of LJT/HE308 catalog for LJT07 connectors (see LJT-HE308 catalog )

-                -      at page 13 of JT catalog for JT07 connectors (see JT catalog )

Q9 - What kind of contacts are available for standard MIL-DTL-38999 connectors (or EN3645 connectors)?

-         -    Crimp contacts:

   These are the most common contacts used with this type of connectors, and described in                MIL-DTL-38999 and EN3645 standard for environmental connectors.

When crimp contacts are delivered with connectors, they are not mounted into connector insert. 

-         -    Crimp contacts:

   We do not give any shelf life for our connectors since it depends on the mating cycles. For instance, for a standard TV connector, the mating cycle is 500. For a composite connector « CTV » fitted with « H » and « J » contact types, it’s 1500 cycles.

When crimp contacts are delivered with connectors, they are not mounted into connector insert. 

-       Solder contacts: hermetic connectors only are equipped with solder contacts (solder cup or eyelet contacts).

Additionally Amphenol has developed enhanced sealing connectors which can be equipped with solder cup contacts (only available in proprietary Amphenol designation).

Solder contacts are always supplied already mounted into connector insert.

-       PC tail contacts: Amphenol has extended contact type range, proposing also PC tail contacts for PC board applications. PC tail contacts are available in different tail length and tail plating. Connector delivered with this type of contacts are only available in Amphenol proprietary part numbers, and PC tail contacts are already mounted into connector insert. 

-       Wire wrap contacts: available in proprietary connector part numbers, please consult us.

-       Press-fit contacts: not available in standard.

 

To get further information on contacts for MIL-DTL-38999 connector contacts, please consult our Contact catalog.

Q10 - Do you have any files that indicates the shelf life of your connectors ?

We do not give any shelf life for our connectors since it depends on the mating cycles. For instance, for a standard TV connector, the mating cycle is 500. For a composite connector « CTV » fitted with « H » and « J » contact types, it’s 1500 cycles.

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Rugged Ethernet & USB Solutions answers 

Q1 - Can we transform our existing RJ45 cordset?

Yes: RJField concept allows to transform any RJ45 cordset (already assembled). http://www.rjfield.com/anim.htm

Q2 - Do we need special tool, or special cabling skills?

No special tool & no special cabling skill requested to transform your RJ45 cordset.
http://www.rjfield.com/anim.htm

Q3 - I have made a mistake (for example: bad coding position or I want to use my plug on another cable), can I “dismount” the insert?

Yes, you can use insert removal tools:

-          RJFODE for RJF and RJFTV series

-          USBFODE for USBFTV series

-          5440 OT 02 for RJF544 series

Only one tool for plug and receptacles.

Q4 -Do I have to order separately panel gasket for square flange receptacle?

Yes: panel gasket have to be ordered separately.

-          Part number JE19 for RJFTV series

-          Part number JE18 for RJF series

-          Part number RJF54402JE for RJF544 series

-          Part number RJFEZJE for RJFEZ series

-          Part number JE15 for USBFTV series

Q5 - How RJField does to improve EMI shielding? 

On conductive shells versions (like “N” and “G” plating for RJF & RJFTV series and “M” version for RJF544 series) the shielding is directly transmitted from shielded RJF45 plug to the receptacle panel through metallized inserts.

If you are looking for 360° shielding, please contact our technical support.

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Q6 - How can we protect the rear of the receptacle?

You can use our sealing gland backshell:

-          Use 2PE & 7PE shells version (backshell + plastic gland)

-          Use 2PEM & 7PEM shells version (backshell + metallic gland)

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Q7 - Are RJField and USBField completely sealed?

RJField and USBField series are IP68 rated. It means that when a plug and a receptacle are connected together or when there is a cap, they are protected against dust and water (under one meter during one hour, without any effect on the connector properties).

Q8 - Do you have a RJField and an USBField sealed receptacle version (when disconnected or without cap)? 

YES, you could use our sealed version 2S or 7S, which provide a waterthighness through the receptacle. This version goal is to protect electronic equipment at the back of the receptacle when there is no cap or when the receptacle is disconnected from the plug.

For very harsh vibration environment, how can we connect the RJF/ USB receptacle back termination to our PCB without using a “fragile” RJ45/USB connection? 

For RJF we propose “2x00” back termination with 8 tinned holes which enable you to solder a wire directly from the RJF Receptacle PCB to your PCB.

For USB, same concept, we propose “2” back termination with 4 tinned holes.

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Q9 - For very harsh vibration environment, how can we connect the RJF/ USB receptacle back termination to our PCB without using a “fragile” RJ45/USB connection?

For RJF we propose “2x00” back termination with 8 tinned holes which enable you to solder a wire directly from the RJF Receptacle PCB to your PCB.
For USB, same concept, we propose “2” back termination with 4 tinned holes.
Q10 - Which cable diameter can be used with our plastic or metallic gland? 

On RJF series, compatible cable diameter is:

-          On standard version from 6mm (0.236 inches) to 13mm (0.512 inches).

-          With reducing grommet 5.5mm (0.216 inches).

On USB series, you don’t have any compatible cable diameter as we don’t provide sealing gland like on RJF series. We suggest using standard cable like our USB cable that you will find on our Field series catalog.

Q11 - Where can I buy your products?

In order to provide you our products, our official distributors are: http://www.amphenol-socapex.com/amphenol/distributeurs.aspx

Q12 - I am looking for documentation, where will I find your catalog? 

You can download all our catalogs by clicking here

Q13 - Are your connectors ROHS/REACH compliant?

You can consult our ROHS/REACH compliance by clicking here
For any nominative compliance, please contact us.
Q14 - Is your connector CE?

The CE marking is not necessary for electrical connectors. The UTE CEF 48B Connector Commission classifies the electrical connectors as passive components and concludes that the CE marking is not required, neither on the product itself, neither on the package. It is however required for the system using this connector.
Q15 - Do you have any files that indicates the shelf life of your connectors ?

We do not give any shelf life for our connectors since it depends on the mating cycles. For instance, for a PT connector, the mating cycle is 500.
Q15 - Do you provide explosion proof solutions?

Yes, you will find our RJF and USB solutions on our Field series catalog. These solutions are zone 2 and class1.

PT/451 Series answers 

Q1- Do you provide explosion proof solutions?

No, we don’t provide ATEX solutions on our PT/451 series.

Q2 - Do you provide MS (MIL-DTL-26482 Series 1) part numbers?

Our PT/451 series is MIL-DTL-26482 Series 1 compliant. You can have a look on our cross references chart pages 18/19 of our PT451 series catalog.
Q3 - Are all your connectors available in solder, crimp and hermetic versions?

Please have a look pages 10/11 of our PT451 series catalog, all our insert arrangements mentionned are available in solder version. Then, there is a C letter for insert arrangements available in crimp version, and a H letter for insert arrangements available in hermetic version.
Q4 - Do I have to order separately panel gasket for square flange receptacle?

Yes: panel gasket have to be ordered separately. You will find all part numbers page 56 of our PT451 series catalog. For example for size 08, you need to order JE08 panel gasket.
Q5 - How can we protect the rear of the connector?

We provide backshell according to your need.
For example:
- If you need a good mechanical retention of the cable, you could use our cable clamp backshell.
- If you need sealing, you could use our metallic or plastic sealing gland.
- If your need a better shielding, you can use our braid clamping backshell.
Q6 - Which wire sizes can be used on our connector?

You will find our contact dimensions and wire sizes page 8 of our PT451 series catalog.
According to you contact dimension (you can check it pages 10/11) you will find acceptable wire section.
Q7 - Which cable diameter can be used with our plastic or metallic gland?

Accepted cable diameters are listed in our PT451 series catalog.These dimensions varies according to the connector’s size. You will find these dimensions:
page 22 for our square flange receptacle
pages 25 and 26 for our inline receptacle
pages 32 and 33 for our plug
Q8 - My connector has an insert alternate positioning, how my printing circuit drilling should be done?

You will find our printed circuit drillings page 59 of our PT451 series catalog. Don’t forget to add the coding rotation on your drilling. For example, your insert rotation is 90°. As the drillings are symetrical about the vertical axis of the figure, you just need to include this 90° rotation clockwise.
Q9 - Where can I buy your products?

In order to provide you our products, our official distributors are: http://www.amphenol-socapex.com/amphenol/distributeurs.aspx.
Q10 - I am looking for documentation, where will I find your catalog?

You can download all our catalogs by clicking here.
Q11 - Are your connectors ROHS/REACH compliant?

You can consult our ROHS/REACH compliance by clicking here.
For any nominative compliance, please contact us.
Q12 - Is your connector CE?

The CE marking is not necessary for electrical connectors. The UTE CEF 48B Connector Commission classifies the electrical connectors as passive components and concludes that the CE marking is not required, neither on the product itself, neither on the package. It is however required for the system using this connector.
Backshells for 38999 Series answers

Q1 - What are the main functions of backshells?

Backshells are used mainly at the rear of plugs, but can also be used at the rear of receptacles.
Functions of backshells are:
-    Mechanical strength (cable retention)
-    Sealing (waterproofness)
-    EMI shielding
Amphenol backshell range is made of pieces which can achieve one of this function or a combination of two or three of these functions.
To get further information, please consult our backshell catalog.

Q2 -Can all MIL-DTL-38999 connectors accept backshells?


All types of plugs and receptacles can accept backshells, except box mounting receptacles (LJT02, LJTP02, JT02, JTP02, TVP02, CTVP02), which do not have any thread at the rear of connector.
Each backshell can be used on both plug and receptacle of the same connector range and size (ex: TV NSA 15 014 can be put at the rear of both TV06RW1535P and TVP00RW1535S or TV07RW1519P)

Q3 - Are backshells delivered with MIL-DTL-38999 connectors?


•    MIL-DTL-38999 series I connectors are generally not delivered with backshell, except for:
o    LJT xx RE versions (= JMS27xxx E), which are delivered with grommet nut
o    LJT xx RE xxx SR versions, which are delivered with strain relief
•    MIL-DTL-38999 series II connectors are generally not delivered with backshell, except for:
o    JT xx RE versions (= JMS27xxx E), which are delivered with grommet nut
o    JT xx RE xxx SR versions, which are delivered with strain relief
•    MIL-DTL-38999 series III connectors are not delivered with any type of backshell.
To get further information on our backshell offer, please consult our backshell catalog.
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ETHERNET SWITCHES Answers

Q1 - What is the difference between Internet and Ethernet, between LAN and WAN?

Internet is a communication protocol for worldwide network (WAN = Wide Area Network). Devices are managed through this network on the basis of IP addresses.
Ethernet is a communication protocol for Local Area Network (LAN) using same media interfaces (mainly RJ45 or fiber). LAN are independent networks but may be linked within a WAN through Internet devices such as Routers.


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Q2 - What are the OSI layers?

2) What are the OSI layers? For many years the OSI model (Open Systems Interconnection Model) has described the layers of information in a network, particularly the low-level transport mechanisms. From top to bottom, these are the layers and how these layers relate to your product design.
Ethernet is physical layers: layers 1 and 2. TCP/IP (Transmission Control Protocol / Internet Protocol) is a protocol, not a network, and uses layers 3 and 4.

Layer Name Function Example
7
Application Meaning of data HTTP
6
Presentation Building blocks of data and encryption
5
Session Opening and closing of specific communication paths
4
Transport Error checking TCP, UDP
3
Network Determination of data paths IP
2
Data link Data transmission, source, destination Ethernet
1
Physical Voltage levels, signal connections, wire, or fiber RJ45, fibre optique

A comparison with the ISO layers
Let’s compare the OSI layers with a road. A man go from office to home with a taxi on the motorway.
Layer 1 (physical layer) = The roads
Layer 2 (Data link) = Source is the office; destination is home.
The MAC address is the unique registration number of the car.
Layer 3 (Network) = Determination of the correct road to take; the IP address is the street address. Same address may be found in several towns.
Layer 4 (Transport) = Error checking: is the destination correct?
Layer 5 (Session) = pay fare; handshake between source and destination
Layer 6 (Presentation) = The taxi is one of many on the road – 1 message in the datastream
Layer 7 (Application) = What is the purpose of travel? The passenger in the taxi is the purpose of the message, which also includes the source and destination information


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Q3 - Industrial Ethernet compared to Fieldbuses?

Since Industrial Ethernet is derivated from office Ethernet, it is clearly an open standard.

Main advantage for customers: there is no restriction with manufacturer’s own proprietary protocols such as with fieldbuses. Examples:
Profibus / Profinet : Siemens
CAN / CANOpen (/DeviceNet : Rockwell)
FIP : Schneider
Interbus : Phoenix contact

Thus any IEEE 802.3 device with a standard 10/100BaseT(X) Ethernet port can be easily connected to each other by just plugging them into the same Ethernet LAN. In addition, Ethernet is already commonplace in office environments, and offers many useful services, such as e-mail, FTP, and web browsing, all well known to users. Applying these services in an industrial control network gives users a head start, since they do not need to spend a lot of time learning new application programs. This also means that training costs can be lowered, and development time can be speeded up, since system developers are already familiar with the software that is readily available for Ethernet applications.
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Q4 - What is TCP/IP?

The Internet Protocol Suite (commonly known as TCP/IP) is the set of communications protocols used for the Internet and other similar networks.
It is named from two of the most important protocols in it: the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) and the Internet Protocol (IP), which were the first two networking protocols defined in this standard.
 The TCP/IP model consists of four layers. From lowest to highest, these are the:
- Link Layer (2)
- Internet Layer (3)
- Transport Layer (4)
- Application Layer (7)
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Q5 - What is different between an Ethernet switch and an Ethernet hub?

The common Ethernet hub simply broadcasts each message it receives to every one of its ports. We may compare it to a loudspeaker.
Each Ethernet device also has to wait for its turn to ‘talk’ to the hub, increasing the probability of message collisions; therefore, real-time operation is jeopardized and determinism is difficult.
Alternatively, a switch automatically determines and remembers where an Ethernet device is located and routes messages only through the appropriate port. This minimizes network loading and enables true deterministic communications over Ethernet.



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Q6 - What information is contained inside a message?

An IP frame contains several information such as:
- The destination IP and MAC address
- The source IP and MAC address
- The type of protocol used (TCP, UDP and others)
- The length of the message
- Encryption data
- VLAN tags
- and much more
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Q7 - What is different between unmanaged, Ring or managed solution?

Basically, an unmanaged switch is a device that forwards packets within a LAN. It is a truly plug and play device which does not require any configuration. Just plug in it, connect the Ethernet cables from users such as personal computers or I/O devices, and it will immediately communicate data between users.

The Ring switch has extended capabilities. It allow to connect devices in a Ring topology. When a link is broken, the Ring switch instantly transfers data to new path. This provide fast network and avoid fault on the network.

A managed switch is a device that forwards packets between LANs. This device also has to capability to support loop configurations using Spanning Tree Protocol. Loop configurations are used to prevent a single point of hardware failure in a network. Management Information about the network is also obtained through the switch by querying the MIB can be configured to improve the network performance and control the traffic. They may be configured via a Telnet console or even a web browser. Different management features are available.
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Q8 - Can I connect any kind of Ethernet switches in a ring?

Be careful!
Unmanaged switches cannot form a ring. In an unmanaged Ethernet network there can be only one path between any two ports on the network. If there is more than one path from one switch to another a broadcast message (and in some cases other messages) sent by the network will be forwarded until it completes a loop by returning on the second path. Since the switches forward all broadcasts and do not keep track of the messages they have sent, the returning message will be sent around the loop again and again. A single message circulating forever around a loop at high speed is clearly not a good thing, so no loops are allowed.

Ring switches allow to form rings based on unique proprietary protocol. This protocol is based on MAC address.

Managed switches allow you to form a ring through the RSTP feature. The Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol (RSTP) allows you to have an Ethernet network with extra connections, so if one path between two points on the network fails, another path can be used to deliver messages. If one link or switch fails, another link or switch can take over transparently to prevent unnecessary down time.
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Q9 - How many switches can I connect together on the same LAN?

Switches can be cascaded almost without limit because unlike a passive hub that has retransmission limitations, an active switch regenerates Ethernet messages as if it were an original transmission.
There really is no limit as long as the total latency is acceptable to your application. For example, the total latency of 10 Ring Switches cascaded (connected in series) is typically less than 50 us.
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Q10 - What is Flow Control?

Devices use flow control to ensure that the receiving device takes in all the data without error. If the transmitting device sends at a faster rate than the receiving device, then the receiving device will eventually have its buffer full. No further information can be taken when the buffer is full, so a flow control signal is sent to the transmitting device to temporarily stop the flow of incoming data.
For each port, Flow Control can be enabled or disabled.
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Q11 - What is the difference between Unicast, Broadcast and Multicast messages?

Broadcast messages are sent to all stations in the network.

Whereas an unicast message is only sent to one station on the network.

Multicast messages are sent to a group of stations, for example video cameras type. Using multicast allows the building of distribution networks, which are suitable for video monitoring or television transmissions over the Internet, i.e. information with one sender and many receivers.

IPv4 addresses as 255.255.255.255 or 192.168.0.255 are BROADCAST IP addresses.
IPv4 addresses from 224.0.0.0 to 239.255.255.255 are MULTICAST IP addresses.
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Q12 - What means Auto-MDI/MDIX-Crossover?

MDI = Media Device Interface
The RJ45 (copper) ports on the switch will automatically detect the cable type (straight-thru vs. cross-wired) and re-configure themselves accordingly.
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Q13 - What is the MAC address?

MAC = Media Access Control
Each Ethernet device has an assigned unique MAC address. This MAC address corresponds to the hardware unique name of the product. It may be compared with the DNA of a human.
This address is fixed during production by the manufacturer and can’t be changed.

Each Ethernet device inserts its unique “MAC” address into each message it sends out. The port on the switch used for a given MAC address is automatically learned when a frame is received from that address. Once an address is learned, the switch will route messages to only the appropriate port, instead of broadcasting messages out all ports like a hub. A time stamp is also placed in memory when a new address is learned. This time stamp is used with the aging feature, which will remove unused MAC addresses from the table after 300 seconds. If a device moves, the associated port on the switch will be changed (migrated) as needed.

In most switches, up to 2,048 MAC addresses can be stored and monitored at any time.
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Q14 - What is an IP address?

The IP address (Internet Protocol) is the unique identifier of each device within a network.
The IP Address of both source and destination device is included in each IP message.
They indicate the source and the destination where IP packets shall go.

An IP address consists of four bytes (for example 192.10.0.5). IP addresses are divided into two parts:
- a network part
- a computer part.

It may be manualy or automaticaly (DHCP) assigned by a server device such as a server, or even a managed Ethernet switch.
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Q15 - Public or private network?

There may be cases where you cannot use or do not want to use public IP addresses on your internal network, instead you can use private IP addresses. These IP addresses will not work on an Internet connection, the solution is then to use NAT (Network Address Translation).

A router or “firewall” with support for NAT translates private addresses to public addresses:
When the computer with address 10.0.1.2 needs to access the Internet, 10.0.1.4 is addressed which is the “Default Gateway” or “way out”. When data from address 10.0.1.2 passes through the router NAT translates the internal IP address 10.0.1.2 to 60.20.10.10 i.e. the IP address on the “outside”. In this way an internal IP address can communicate with other computers on the Internet.

IANA (Internet Assigned Numbers Authority) has reserved the following three address blocks for IP addresses in private networks:
10.0.0.0 - 10.255.255.255 172.16.0.0 -
172.31.255.255 192.168.0.0 -
192.168.255.255
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Q16 - Is a switch managed with its IP address or its MAC address?

The MAC address is the unique hardware signature of each device. When the IP address is the identifier of each device inside a local network.

A managed switch is differentiated in a network using its IP address.

An unmanaged switch will be recognised only based on its MAC address.

Amphenol Ring switches are intermediate models, partially managed. Like unmanaged switches, they use MAC addresses to handle the network.
Moreover, due to a proprietary network, they also offer some of the interesting management features, normally available with managed switches.
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Q17 - What is IGMP?

IGMP (Internet Group Management Protocol) allows hosts and routers to work together to optimize forwarding of multicast traffic on a network.
Without IGMP, all multicast packets must be forwarded to all network segments.
With IGMP, multicast traffic is only forwarded to network segments, which connect interested hosts.

An IGMP snooping switch performs many of the functions of an IGMP router.
Periodically, routers and IGMP snooping switches in active mode send an IGMP Query on each attached network. (The query interval is generally around 1-2 minutes.)
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Q18 - How can I access software for the managed switch?

The recommended method for accessing the switch is using a Web User Interface such as Internet Explorer.
This method is very simple. Just be careful by configuring the network parameters. Refer to the Managed Software user manual for details.

Some models may also be accessed with a serial connection or also with a Telnet connection.
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Q19 - What is VLAN?

VLAN can segregate traffic flowing through a switch to improve bandwidth utilization or security. Segregation is done based on membership in a group of ports (port-based VLANs) or on IEEE 802.1Q tags which include a VLAN ID (tag-based VLANs).

A port-based VLAN limits traffic coming in a port to the group of ports to which that port belongs. For example, if ports 1, 3, 5, 7, and 9 were placed in a port-based VLAN, broadcast frames coming in port 3 would be sent to ports 1, 5, 7, and 9 (which are members of port 3's VLAN) but not to ports 2, 4, 6, and 8 (which are not members).

A tag-based VLAN limits traffic based on the VLAN ID in a 'tag' associated with the frame. VLAN tags may be explicitly placed in frames by applications or switching equipment, or implicitly assigned to frames based on the switch port where they arrive.

The VLAN feature is available on our managed switches.
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Q20 - What is port mirroring?

The mirroring feature is ideal for performing diagnostics by allowing traffic that is being sent to and received from one or more source ports to be replicated out a monitoring/target port.
Port mirroring is available both with managed switches and Ring switches.
Data is monitoring with a network monitor software.
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Q21 - What are SNMP, RMON and MIB?

SNMP (Simple Network Management Protocol) and RMON (Remote Monitoring) provide a means to monitor and manage your network. Each SNMP device maintains Management Information Bases (MIBs) containing information about the operation and configuration of the device.

Each MIB contains a variety of information such as:
- Information about the switch as a system: name, description, physical location;
- VLAN
- IGMP
- statistics
- and much more
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 Q22 - Is the Ring switch Managed or unmanaged?

The Ring models are “half-managed”. They combines the plug-and-play simplicity of an unmanaged switch with some high performance features of managed switches. Ring Switch can be pre-configured to just run. But it is also possible to fine tune the performance of the ring by using a simple Windows wizard.

Other advanced capabilities include:
- priority queuing for prioritizing your traffic
- message rate filtering for broadcast storm protection
- port mirroring for diagnostics.

A Ring switch bases its switching process on MAC address instead of IP address.
Thus, the Ring switch is a layer 2 device.
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Q23 - What are the advantages of a Ring switch?

The fault tolerance provided by Ring switches is not possible with conventional Ethernet hubs or unmanaged switches.
The RSTP (Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol) algorithm in Managed Switches can be used to create rings. However, Spanning Trees were designed for the office environment and do not guarantee deterministic performance. Ring switches, on the other hand, are deterministic by design and use their knowledge of the well-known alternative paths to ensure real-time recovery of network failures. Ring switches are also simpler to install, with no configuration necessary in most situations.

Ring Advantages Over Spanning Trees and Other Schemes

• Deterministic performance – 5 mS per hop
• No IP address or complex set up required
• Expandable to 50+ nodes (RSTP limited to 6 hops max.)
• Can increase reliability by establishing multiple rings
• No ring master is required – no one switch is critical
• Ring switches are ultra stable
• Ring switches cost less than Managed Switches
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SL61 Answers

Q1 - Do I have to order separately straight or right angle backshells for plugs?

You can order your plug and your inline receptacle with or without backshell. If you order your connector without backshell, you can finally add backshell as separate part as mentioned on following tab:

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Q2 - Which wire sizes can be used on our connector?

You will find our contact dimensions and wire sizes page 2 of our SL61 series datasheet. According to your contact dimension you will find maximum permissible wire section.
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Q3 - Which cable diameter can be used with our backshell?

Accepted cable diameters are listed in our SL61 series datasheet. These dimensions varies according to the connector’s size. You will find these dimensions page 3 of the datasheet. Different clamping pads are delivered with the backshells.
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Q4 - I need a sealing solution, which SL product should I use?

We suggest using our SL61 monopiece solution. This series is waterproof IP 67 rated and is 100% compatible with all the Socapex 419AR range. Gland backshells are available in size 29 or 36 according to the outside diameter of the cable.
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Q5 - Where can I buy your products?

In order to provide you our products, our official distributors are: http://www.amphenol-socapex.com/amphenol/distributeurs.aspx.
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Q6 - I am looking for documentation, where will I find your catalog?

You can download all our catalogs by clicking here.
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Q7 - Are your connectors ROHS/REACH compliant?

You can consult our ROHS/REACH compliance by clicking here. For any nominative compliance, please contact us.
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Q8 - Is your connector CE?

The CE marking is not necessary for electrical connectors. The UTE CEF 48B Connector Commission classifies the electrical connectors as passive components and concludes that the CE marking is not required, neither on the product itself, neither on the package. It is however required for the system using this connector.
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